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Residential Roofing

How to Hold Successful Sales Calls Using Video Conferencing Tools

By Dawn Killough

April 16, 2020

A property owner having a video call with a contractor.

Now that social distancing has become standard practice, how do you continue making sales calls so your business can survive?

Remote sales calls made over video conferencing tools allow you to stay in contact with prospects while keeping everyone safe. By using technology wisely, you can work to foster that one-on-one connection that helps keep your customers happy.

Here are some tips for using video conferencing tools to build and nurture customer relationships in these times. Before starting any roofing project, check your state and local government websites to be sure that there are no restrictions on roofing that may impact your project.

How to Close Sales while Social Distancing

There are lots of digital tools you can use to help continue selling roofing projects even while dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. Since many homeowners and building owners may be hesitant to start work during this uncertain time, it's important to remind them that delaying repairs can lead to more damage and expense later. Set your customers' minds at ease by explaining how you can still service them while keeping everyone safe.

To keep site visits to a minimum, contractors can use tools like digital roof measurement to provide pricing. You can order an aerial roof report from services such as GAF QuickMeasure or Eagleview. You can also use drone technology to inspect roofs while maintaining social distancing.

Use email to send quotes and product literature, which can be downloaded from GAF's site, or share them through a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. If your clients would prefer to receive materials through the mail, you can send them copies of the literature or drop it on their doorstep.

When it's time to have a conversation with the client, take advantage of phone calls or video conferencing. You'll want to research different video conferencing software platforms and choose the best one for your company. Options include Zoom, Skype, Google Hangouts, and many more.

Look into other digital tools to help with closing sales, including DocuSign or Adobe for signing proposals, and electronic payment and financing options. These tools will help to keep your business going during this time.

Tips for Professional Video Calls

You don't have to be a professional videographer to participate in a video conference call. If you don't have much experience with video calls, here are a few tips to help you succeed when meeting with potential clients:

  1. Make sure you're sitting in front of a professional-looking background. If possible, a blank wall is best. Remove anything that could be a distraction to your client. Some software programs will allow you to blur the background if this isn't possible.
  2. Consider using a headset microphone to ensure good audio quality. Phones, tablets, and laptops all have built-in microphones, but their quality varies. Also, make sure to limit background noises as much as possible during the call.
  3. Check the camera angle from your phone, tablet, or laptop. You want the camera at eye-level, not looking up your nose. Use books to prop up your device if needed. Make sure you're close enough to the camera to be easily seen and heard, but not so close that your face is the only thing your client sees.
  4. Use gentle, indirect lighting. Bright light shining in your face will wash you out. Also, don't sit near a window, as the natural lighting can appear too harsh through the camera.
  5. Test the audio and video before your first call. Set up a trial run with a coworker. Adjust the video and audio until the call quality is good and the visual is pleasant.
  6. If you are making the call from home, try to limit interruptions from kids or pets. While everyone's aware of the current situation and will likely be understanding, it can still be distracting.
  7. Dress professionally. You don't have to wear a suit, but you still want to create a professional image. A nice collared shirt works fine.

For more pro tips around preparation, body language and technical setup, LinkedIn offers a free, 30-minute training course on Executive Presence on Video Conference Calls. With a bit of practice and the right setup, you can be ready to make effective remote calls using video conferencing tools. This way, you can engage with your customers and build positive relationships while still maintaining a safe distance.

For more tips, tools and updates, see the GAF Contractor Resources for Social Distancing.


The information contained in this article was authored by a third party and is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

About the Author

Dawn Killough is a freelance writer in the construction, finance, and accounting fields. She is the author of an ebook about green building and writes for construction tech and green building websites. She lives in Salem, Oregon with her husband and four cats.

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